Parasite-contaminated bagged salad sickens more than 100 in Midwest


Heads up, salad eaters: More than 100 people across several states in the Midwest have been sickened after consuming grocery store-bought bagged salad that contains cyclospora, a parasite that can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, and fatigue.

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announced on Tuesday that at least 122 people across seven states have been sickened after consuming the salad mix that is packaged as Hy-Vee Brand Garden Salads, Jewel-Osco Signature Farms Brand Garden Salads and ALDI Little Salad Bar Brand Garden Salads. At least 19 people have been hospitalized as a result.

The recalled salad. (FDA)

The salad mix, which contains carrots, red cabbage, and iceberg lettuce, has since been recalled after it was distributed to stores in several states, including Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

The CDC said the highest number of illnesses is reported in Iowa with 54. Illinois has 30. Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Wisconsin also have reported illnesses, which were first reported on May 11 and have been as recent as June 15.

The recalled salad.

The recalled salad.
(FDA)

“Check your home for any of these recalled salads. Throw any remaining salad away, even if some of it has been eaten and no one has gotten sick,” the CDC advised. “If you live in Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin and don’t know whether the bagged garden salad blend you have in your home is one of these recalled salads, do not eat it. Throw it away.”

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Cyclospora cayetanensis is a microscopic parasite that can cause the intestinal illness cyclosporiasis when people eat food or drink water that’s contaminated with Cyclospora, per the FDA, which noted that is typically more common in “certain tropical or subtropical regions of the world.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 



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